Fred Flix: Old Commercials That Would Be Politically Incorrect Today

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Source: Fred Flix– Funny face, LOL! 

Source: The Daily Review

The flat tire commercial where it’s automatically assumed that the woman can’t change a tire, certainly wouldn’t play today. Back in 1955 or the ( the Utopia for the Christian-Right ) it was consider unfeminine for women to be involved in any form for physical work that’s traditionally done by men. And since gays were still living in the closet including lesbians, gay masculine women weren’t even around at least in public, so no woman back then was expected to do physical manly work. ( To make a politically incorrect joke ) So no changing the flat tires on the cars, or fixing appliances, home improvement, working on cars, construction work, nothing that would be considered manly. Women were expected to stay away from all of those activities in America.

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Source: Jonathan East– Warning for people who hate free speech 

The commercial with the beautiful sexy women that looks like it came out in the late 1970s just from the color picture and how the hair and everything else looked, as a straight man I don’t have any problems with that commercial. I could see why radical feminists would have a problem with it because they would view it as sexual exploitation. Taking advantage of women’s sex appeal and beauty. But they probably see professional cheerleader squads as sexist as well even though none of these women are expected to participate in any of these activities. I could see why a commercial like that wouldn’t play in San Francisco or New York or Boston, but don’t know why it would be a problem anywhere else in the country.

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Source: EBay– Not for people who hate free speech 

The cigarette and tobacco commercials, are not politically incorrect in anyway, because they’re simply not offensive to anyone. The problems that they have with especially chewing tobacco is that tobacco and even tobacco cigarets are so unpopular today because so many Americans at least now know what tobacco does to you and the health risks that come from it. Tobacco unlike alcohol which is still very popular is becoming taboo in America. Even smokers won’t smoke in their homes anymore especially if they have kids or if their spouse doesn’t like tobacco. But back in lets say 1975 or whenever that commercial came out practically every American was smoking. You almost had to back in the 1970s to be considered cool or groovy, far out, hip, whatever the hip term was then.

The commercial with the office secretary, kind of looks sexist to me, but in a funny way. Apparently the woman in the commercial is looking for a lunch date with her boss ( of all people ) and believes she can get that simply by wearing the right perfume or deodorant. Sort of implying that she’s trying to move up in the company by being nice to her boss. If that commercial came out 10-15 years later or was part of a sitcom from let’s say 1975-79 or even later, the commercial would’ve implied that the woman was trying to sleep her way to the top. I would see even as a hard core supporter for free speech who believes in almost no limits on it why that commercial could be seen as sexist.

We just live in a very different world now as we did in 1955. In some ways free speech and personal freedom is even more popular now where women aren’t expected to stay home and where couples aren’t expected to get married before they move in together or have sex, or even have kids together. But in other ways even though our constitutional right to free speech is just as strong as it was 60-65 years ago, it’s become less popular with young people. Who believe anyone who isn’t a straight, male, Christian, Caucasian, has some artificial right not to be offended. Which of course is obviously not true, but you wouldn’t know that from our current pop culture and even political culture. One of the reasons why Donald Trump is President of the United States, because you have millions of Americans probably tens of millions who are fed up with political correctness.

Fred Flix: Olf Commercial That Would Be Politically Incorrect Today

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