Sophia Loren: Education is a Lifelong Pursuit

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Source: Chris Veerabadran– The Italian Goddess Sophia Loren, with some sound educational advice

Source:The Daily Review

The Italian Goddess Sophia Loren, making it extremely clear that she isn’t just a great body with a hot baby face that she actually has not just a brain inside, but a big brain inside that’s always not just working, but working well to improve herself and people around her. Her quote here about education is a perfect example of that. Only the dumbest of the dumb people who had brain surgeries on them by people who were simply stealing brains with no intentions of fixing the brains and giving them back to the rightful owners, believe that education stops once we graduate college or in some cases still high school.

High school, is where we go to prepare ourselves for college and in some cases so we can get a job once we graduate from high school and make sure we have the basic skills down. Reading, writing, math, history, social studies, etc. College is where we go to prepare ourselves for life as adults and get the skills that we need to get ourselves a good job and be able to support ourselves in life with a good job. As well as to party, have a good time, meet people and other things as well. But life, is where we get the best and most important lessons about ourselves and where we really get to learn about ourselves and people around us. How to treat others and how others will treat us. Who we can trust, who we can count on, who we should look out for, so we don’t get too close to them, because they can’t be trusted.

There those old expressions that life is a journey or highway and as true as they are life is so much more than that. Life is an experience that starts when we’re born and doesn’t end until we die. You can also say that life is a roller coaster with all it’s ups and downs that is performed by the most imperfect of people known as human beings where we’re always trying new things and having new experiences and hopefully learning from them. The people who do best in life ride the fewest roller coasters and when they take risks they take calculated risks knowing that if it works out they’ll do very well, but if those calculated risks don’t work out there won’t be that heavy of price to pay for it at least not to the point that it can ruin their lives, because they’re acting on experience and knowledge and know going in what the risks and rewards were, because they did a real cost-benefit analysis.

The people who do best in life, the winners in life are the people who never get off the journey of life and are always moving forward and learning in life. Never too up and never too down, because even when they make mistakes they use them and take advantage of them by using them as opportunities for self-improvement. Instead of saying to themselves, “I really screwed up here, I’m never going to try that again!” Or acting as if their life is over and they’ll never recover from that mistake.

But when people are up they perhaps climbed that mountaintop and now feel they’re at the top, they take that for what it’s worth knowing that if they don’t continue to improve and to learn that the next stop for them can be only be down, because they stop learning and improving and become overconfident. People tend to make mistakes when they stop learning and improving and make decisions based on old information and what they’re done before and stop learning and improving. People are most likely to make mistakes in life when they’re either overconfident, or are out of control and acting on emotion instead of reason and intelligence.

It’s that old quote from President Richard Nixon during his last day as President in 1974 because he was forced to resign because of his involvement in Watergate, where he says, “only when you’ve been in the deepest valley can you know what it’s like to be on the highest mountain.” Life is an experience where we all go through our highs and downs and all at some point in our life have been at the valley at some point going through a really rough time. But the only people who’ve gotten to the highest mountain or at the top of any mountain are the people who’ve learned from their bad experiences and used them to improve themselves. And were never satisfied at being on the bottom or even in the middle of the pack, because they took advantage of what life has to offer which is really education about ourselves and the people around us. That is what I get from this Sophia Loren quote.

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Source: AZ Quotes– The Italian Goddess Sophia Loren – Source: The Toothless Owl: Sophia Loren- Quote– The Italian Goddess Sophia Loren 

 

TIME Magazine: Julia Zorthian- How To Recover From Failure

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Source: TIME Magazine– Move on and start over

Source: TIME Magazine: Julia Zorthian- How To Recover From Failure

I’m not a doctor and don’t pretend be one, but from what I know about the medical profession (which might only be enough to fill one paragraph) is that good doctors at least don’t try to fix the problems without first performing a diagnosis. They actually take the time to see what is the medical problem with the patient before they try to fix the problem. People get wrong prescriptions because their doctors given them the wrong diagnosis and recommend a prescription that might fix another problem, but not the problem that this patient is facing. People get even sicker or see their physical conditions worsen simply because their original problem wasn’t diagnosed properly and therefor not effectively treated.

Giving someone an aspirin to deal with a broken ankle might give the patient short-term pain relief, but still leaving the ankle broken and perhaps it even gets worst because the patient believes their ankle is recovering. That would be an example of an extreme misdiagnosis. Maybe the doctor was drunk when they looked at the patent’s ankle, or perhaps examined the head by accident, before recommending aspirin for the pain. But hopefully you get the idea.

Another way to look at failures and weaknesses lets say is from the perspective of an addict. Lets use alcoholic as an example. I’m not an alcoholic either, but from what I’ve read and even seem to some extent that the only way an alcoholic can recover is first acknowledging that they have a problem that they’re indeed an alcoholic. They drink too much alcohol, get drunk too much and perhaps to the point that being drunk is a normal condition for them. Which I guess would be an extreme form of alcoholism. So my only point here is to before you try to fix a problem or personal problems that you might have, you first have to diagnose the problem and know what the problem is. Once you’ve accomplished step a, you can work to addressing the problem with a recovery plan.

Right-wing author and radio talk show host Eric Metaxas who I agree with as often as Los Angeles sees snow in August, but who was on BookTV on C-SPAN in I believe September (some of us actually have hobbies outside of realty TV and social media and like to use our brains) made a good point about mistakes and even screw ups. And he essentially said that we’re all screw ups. Thats not the question or the issue. The question and issue is what do we do about them.

Do we ignore them and not learn from history and keep repeating the same mistakes and seeing our problems get worst? “Those who don’t learn from history, are doomed to repeat it.” Or do we acknowledge them, take them in and even absorb them and memorize that feeling to the point that it feels so bad not that we don’t want to be consumed by it and let our failures run our lives, but that we know the feeling of failure so well that we don’t want to feel like that again. Not about being pessimist or overly optimistic, but being in touched with reality so we know exactly what’s going on so we know what to do about it.

John F. Kennedy is  a political hero of mine, but one of the biggest reasons why is that he always challenged Americans to think and try to improve and move forward. Challenge the status quo not necessarily because the status quo was bad itself, but that we wanted us to be as good as we possibly can be. Which is one of my broad points here is that we all make mistakes and maybe Eric Metaxas isn’t completely right here and that we’re not all screw ups. I mean, if we were we would be nation of very stupid weak people who can’t seem to get anything right.

But Metaxas is right about at least one thing that we all screw up. And then the question becomes what was the mistake exactly and then figuring out what can be done about it. Unless you killed someone, including yourself and you’re not permanently paralyzed or are hurt so badly that you’ve been given a death sentence and will die in the short-term, whatever mistake you made there is a recovery plan to fix it. Or at least learn from it and do better in the future.

I’ll just leave you with this. For almost every problem short of killing someone and permanently paralyzing yourself, there’s a solution to that problem. It then becomes once you acknowledge that you have a problem and know what the problem is. For every mistake there’s a correction. Including horrible mistakes like running your business into the ground and going bankrupt, or making horrible investments that also lead to high debt and perhaps bankruptcy.

The alcoholism example is perfect here. Once you realize you are indeed an alcoholic and have a real problem there, you then can get treatment for it and recover. People have screwed up so badly in one profession that they can’t find any more work in that profession, but recover from that and prosper working in a different field. Take former White House Counsel John Dean who was part of President Nixon’s Watergate coverup who is now a successful author and columnist. A very successful writer now even though he was disbarred as a lawyer.

Step a, is acknowledging that you have a problem.

Step b, is knowing exactly what your problem is.

Step c, is putting together a recovery plan to fix the problem.

Step d, learning from your mistakes not to get overwhelmed by them, but so you know what went wrong and not to repeat the same mistakes. And then improving yourself so you do better in the future. Not about making mistakes in life. Of course we all do and perhaps have all made a lot of mistakes. The question is what do we do about them. Do we learn from them so we can do better in the future. Or ignore them and continue to repeat our negative history.

TIME Magazine: This is The Best Way to Recover From Failure